Route Maps & Details for Zwift’s Paris Course

Route Maps & Details for Zwift’s Paris Course

This page includes route maps and other details for Zwift’s Paris course. The small, single-circuit map launched on June 26, 2020 in order to host the final stage of the first-ever Virtual Tour de France.

Looking for other courses? Jump to Watopia Routes, London Routes, New York City Routes, Innsbruck Routes, Yorkshire Routes, Crit City Routes, Bologna TT, Richmond Routes, or France Routes.

Champs-Élysées

Animated “Champs-Élysées” Route Details (Paris) Map
Animated map provided by ZwiftHacks

As the final stage of first-ever Virtual Tour de France, Zwift’s Champs-Élysées route was designed to mimic what may be the most recognizable road in the world: the Avenue des Champs-Élysées in Paris.

While the avenue is known for its theaters, cafés, luxury shops, and annual Bastille Day parade, it’s best-known among cyclists as the finish of the Tour de France!

As the final stage of first-ever Virtual Tour de France, Zwift’s Champs-Élysées route was designed to mimic what may be the most recognizable road in the world: the Avenue des Champs-Élysées in Paris.

While the avenue is known for its theaters, cafés, luxury shops, and annual Bastille Day parade, it’s best-known among cyclists as the finish of the Tour de France!

Route Basics

Length: 6.6 km (4.1 miles)
Elevation:
34 m (112‘)
Lead-In: 3.2 km (2.0 miles)
Map: Paris

Start & Finish

Laps begin and end at lap banner. There is a significant lead-in from the start pens/spawn point.

Achievement Badge: 130 XP

Banners and Leaderboards

(in order of appearance)
Lutece Sprint

Bike Selection

This route is quite flat overall. Your fastest times will come from an aero setup!

Fastest Frames >
Fastest Wheels >

Route Description

Route profile by ZwiftHub – the place to plan and track your route achievements!

Avenue des Champs-Élysées runs between the Place de la Concorde (to the east) and the Place de l’Étoile (to the west, where the Arc de Triomphe is located). The official Champs-Élysées finishing circuit loops around the Jardin des Tuileries on the east end, and around the Arc de Triomphe on the west end.

You will begin with a lead-in around Jardin des Tuileries. The road around the back of the garden includes a short ramp down and back up – the steepest sections of the circuit. Once you finish your loop around the garden you will soon ride through the start/finish arch, which begins the official circuit.

Note the iconic cobbles under your wheels as you feel the road turn upward – you’re on Montée des Champs Elysées, the 1.3km climb up to the Arc de Triomphe. It’s not a steep climb, but you can expect attacks here every lap when racing. There’s also a sprint point here, which only raises the stakes higher!

Once you arrive at Place de l’Étoile the road levels out for a quick turn around the Arc de Triomphe, then it’s time to descend Avenue des Champs-Élysées. Note the Obelisk of Luxor visible in the distance at the other end of the circuit. You may also glimpse the Eiffel Tower, if you know where to look!

Lutece Express

Animated “Lutece Express” Route Details (Paris) Map
Animated map provided by ZwiftHacks

Paris’ Lutece Express route is simply the reverse version of the iconic Champs-Élysées route created for the first-ever Virtual Tour de France. It runs in a clockwise direction, giving riders a chance to experience a virtual version of the most recognizable avenue in the world: the Avenue des Champs-Élysées in Paris.

While the avenue is known for its theatres, cafés, luxury shops, and annual Bastille Day parade, it’s best-known among cyclists as the finish of the Tour de France race!

Paris’ Lutece Express route is simply the reverse version of the iconic Champs-Élysées route created for the first-ever Virtual Tour de France. It runs in a clockwise direction, giving riders a chance to experience a virtual version of the most recognizable avenue in the world: the Avenue des Champs-Élysées in Paris.

While the avenue is known for its theatres, cafés, luxury shops, and annual Bastille Day parade, it’s best-known among cyclists as the finish of the Tour de France race!

Route Basics

Length: 6.6 km (4.1 miles)
Elevation:
33 m (108‘)
Lead-In: 3.5 km (2.2 miles)
Map: Paris

Start & Finish

Laps begin and end at lap banner. There is a lead-in from the start pens/spawn point.

Restriction:

Achievement Badge: 130 XP

Banners and Leaderboards

(in order of appearance)
Lutece Sprint Reverse

Bike Selection

This route is quite flat overall. Your fastest times will come from an aero setup!

Fastest Frames >
Fastest Wheels >

Route Description

Route profile by ZwiftHub – the place to plan and track your route achievements!

Avenue des Champs-Élysées runs between the Place de la Concorde (to the east) and the Place de l’Étoile (to the west, where the Arc de Triomphe is located). The official Champs-Élysées finishing circuit loops around the Jardin des Tuileries on the east end, and around the Arc de Triomphe on the west end.

Your lap lead-in begins with a left turn out of the start pens to take you immediately up Montée des Champs Elysées, the climb on Avenue des Champs-Élysées up toward the Arc de Triomphe. In a race, you can expect this climb to be the site of attacks on every lap.

The road levels out as you circle the Arc de Triomphe, then it’s time to head downhill toward Place de la Concorde. Take a quick breath and look around – you’re riding iconic cobbles that have hosted the finish of Le Tour since 1975! Note the Obelisk of Luxor visible in the distance at the other end of the circuit. (You may also glimpse the Eiffel Tower, if you know where to look!)

The sprint segment is downhill and fast – hit it hard and try to grab the green jersey! Then continue down to the lap banner, where your first lap officially begins.

The two lanes will separate when you arrive at Place de la Concorde, and the road will take you around Jardin des Tuileries. Watch the backstretch here – the road dips into a parking garage and ramps quickly out. Hold a good position, finish circling the garden, and you’ll find yourself back at the start pens.

About The Author

Eric Schlange

Eric runs Zwift Insider in his spare time when he isn't on the bike or managing various business interests. He lives in Northern California with his beautiful wife, two kids and dog. Follow on Strava

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Dan
Dan
6 months ago

I must be honest, I’m pretty underwhelmed by the Paris course. I think it really highlights the weaknesses in Zwift’s graphics. The course looks pretty plain and very samey, which of course isn’t helped by the road profile. If the graphics were much higher fidelity, such as Veloton, it would help, but the cartoon-nature of Zwift and the low polygon density makes it very meh. Where Zwift does work are green, open, meandering routes such as Titans Grove, and I’m a real fan of the new France routes. I’m sure Paris will make a great racing course but I can’t… Read more »

Paul
Paul
6 months ago
Reply to  Dan

I’ll probably only ride it twice to get the badges. Not much appeal in a short lap to me, but I can see how racers will like it.

Darren
Darren
6 months ago
Reply to  Dan

yep. By the standards of year 2020, the graphics are just not up to snuff.

Kim S
Kim S
6 months ago

I wish the folks at Zwift would learn the definition of the word “flat.” The only truly flat route in all the Zwift worlds is Tempus Fugit in Watopia. I had hopes of getting another route suitable for workouts when I heard about Paris. Sadly, over 100 feet of climb in just 4 miles doesn’t get it done. There are already two “worlds” that are pretty much unusable for riders who aren’t interested in heroic climbing (Innsbruck and Yorkshire). Looks like Paris might be the third addition to the list. Very disappointed…

David Cooper
David Cooper
6 months ago
Reply to  Kim S

There is not much in the real world that is genuinely “flat”, so it should hardly come as a surprise that the courses which simulate real world locations are not “flat” either. I have never cycled up the Champs-Elysee, but I have walked it a few times, and the description here is pretty much as I remember it being.

Lionel Mawditt
Lionel Mawditt
6 months ago
Reply to  Kim S

Just unpair your smart trainer but keep power connected if you need consistent resistance for efforta but still want to load to Zwift. You can do that mid-ride if you want alternating gradients before/after

Anon
Anon
5 months ago
Reply to  Kim S

Please don’t be offended but I think this comment deserves a HTFU…. Cheers 🙂

Jerrads
Jerrads
6 months ago

No badge awarded… 😭

Andrew
Andrew
6 months ago

Do these Paris roads have more rolling resistance than ‘normal’ roads?

Nickey
Nickey
6 months ago

When will the routes be opened for rotation? I really like anything new on zwift. The bigger the variety, the more interested it keeps me.

Aaron Lipton
Aaron Lipton
2 months ago

why don’t the sprints have Strava segments?

Brick
Brick (@brick-climber)
15 days ago

News of the Physical Route

Looks like not everyone is happy with the existing real-world route either. But the coming redesign should be breathtakingly beautiful. 😀

Guardian: PARIS AGREES TO TURN CHAMPS-ÉLYSÉES INTO ‘EXTRAORDINARY GARDEN’

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/10/paris-approves-plan-to-turn-champs-elysees-into-extraordinary-garden-anne-hidalgo


The committee held a public consultation over what should be done with the avenue. The plans include reducing space for vehicles by half, turning roads into pedestrian and green areas, and creating tunnels of trees to improve air quality.

Last edited 15 days ago by Brick
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