Tacx Bushido Smart

Tacx Bushido Smart Wheel On Trainer

The Bushido was Tacx's high-end wheel-on trainer, offering higher wattages than most. It was also a completely wireless, operating on the wattage generated by the rider! A great idea in principle, but reliability and consistency were not the Bushido's strengths.

 

Key Specs

  • MSRP: $900 USD
  • Accuracy: +-5%
  • Flywheel: 1lb
  • Max Wattage: 1400 W
  • Max Incline: 15%

Where to Buy

This trainer is no longer in production, but you may find a good deal on used or old stock.

More Details

  • Brand: Tacx
  • Year Released: 2014  (No longer in production)
  • Axle Compatibility: 130/135mm quick release, 12x142 and 12x148 thru-axle
  • Requires Calibration
  • Weight: 10.8kg
  • Cadence: Built in
  • Communication: ANT+ and Bluetooth
  • Physical Dimensions: 26" x 25" (66 cm x 63 cm)
Click for Android App Click for iOS App

Support App: Tacx Utility

The Tacx Utility app can be used to upgrade the firmware on your Tacx trainer, as well as calibrate any Tacx trainer that requires calibration. This app is notoriously finicky, though – calibration of wheel-on trainers can be especially tedious. If at first you don’t succeed, tweak the tension adjuster and/or tire pressure, then try again!

NEO owners: we highly recommend following the firmware update rules from TacxFaqs.com, to avoid bricking your trainer.

Overall Rating

3.3 stars
based on 12 reviews

Easy setup
83%
Accurate power
25%
Realistic inertia
17%
Well-built
42%
Helpful support
0%
Portable/storable
92%
Quiet
33%
Budget-friendly
58%

perfect wireless setup from McDry October 6, 2020 

priceworthy only-wireless trainer (wireless functioning capability like the tacx Neo) does needs some care on rusty parts like the clamps holding the axel. Overall used it for 3 years with pleasure. I fixed the roller issue (coming loose of the metal sleeve, common problem) easily with epoxy glue, and with succes.

Easy setup Realistic inertia Portable/storable Budget-friendly

Solid Trainer if strong from jb September 30, 2020 

Performance:
This unit has poor ride feel with comparatively no inertia feel. For workouts however it is great. One word of advice is if you have an FTP below 200 I think you will have issues as the unit is self powered and does not work properly at low watts. Fairly loud for a smart trainer.

Reliability.
The tire contact roll has issues and can degrade which causes a ticking noise. I was able to fix with super glue but the noise has come back. Overall not the most reliable.

Easy setup Portable/storable

Broke after two sessions from Rzemieniec September 27, 2020 

Probably it was damaged during transport but mine got broke after two zwift sessions
Started to give "cracking" noises after first interval training
Cool thing is that You take it whenever You like, even remote place with no electricity and still be able to train

Easy setup Portable/storable Quiet

Do you want a top trainer wheel on? from Jack63 September 14, 2020 

It is compatible with the "Ant + FE-C" and "Bluetooth smart open" protocols. You can use all available Tacx software / apps and various third party software (Zwift, TrainerRoad, etc). It is compatible with Garmin devices equipped with the "Ant + Indoor Trainer" function. The Bushido is easy to calibrate. The trainer is very compact and does not require power. The pedaling is realistic enough for a whell on trainer.

Easy setup Accurate power Well-built Portable/storable

Good but a heavier flywheel would be appreciated from Andy September 12, 2020 

It's hard to judge this trainer fairly as I don't have anything to compare it to except the wahoo kickr snap. For the most part it does what it's supposed to do. Occasionally it takes a while for zwift to find it at the initial start up page (I use ANT). I've never had any problems with drop outs but there are some things that cold be better:

1) I had massive issues getting the amount of compression right on the wheel clamp. I had to get a 25c indoor wheel and even then I have to pump it to 130 psi and it still isn't able to reach the optium level of resistance when calibrating.

2) The tacx phone apps are rubbish. They sometimes work. They sometimes don't work.

3) it started out surprisingly quiet. It's now very noisy after 2 years use.

4) I'm not sure if the bushido even has a flywheel. If it does, you wouldn't know it. When using with zwift the most annoying thing about this trainer is that it simulates momentum very badly. On a lumpy road section, hitting a hill at the bottom of a fast decent, the bushido whacks the resistance right up regardless of how fast your wheel is spinning. Other trainers avoid this with a heavy flywheel.

Overall it's not a bad trainer. But you dont get much for the extra cost of this versus the flux. Naively, I was drawn in by the highest max watts and Max gradient simulation that the bushido can sustain. In reality these things are minor issues compared to the general feel of riding. Unless you can get a good deal on this trainer I'd say buy the flux insteae or save up for a wahoo.

Easy setup Portable/storable

More Tacx Bushido Smart Reviews

Own this trainer? Post a review!

perfect wireless setup from McDry October 6, 2020 

priceworthy only-wireless trainer (wireless functioning capability like the tacx Neo) does needs some care on rusty parts like the clamps holding the axel. Overall used it for 3 years with pleasure. I fixed the roller issue (coming loose of the metal sleeve, common problem) easily with epoxy glue, and with succes.

Easy setup Realistic inertia Portable/storable Budget-friendly

Solid Trainer if strong from jb September 30, 2020 

Performance:
This unit has poor ride feel with comparatively no inertia feel. For workouts however it is great. One word of advice is if you have an FTP below 200 I think you will have issues as the unit is self powered and does not work properly at low watts. Fairly loud for a smart trainer.

Reliability.
The tire contact roll has issues and can degrade which causes a ticking noise. I was able to fix with super glue but the noise has come back. Overall not the most reliable.

Easy setup Portable/storable

Broke after two sessions from Rzemieniec September 27, 2020 

Probably it was damaged during transport but mine got broke after two zwift sessions
Started to give "cracking" noises after first interval training
Cool thing is that You take it whenever You like, even remote place with no electricity and still be able to train

Easy setup Portable/storable Quiet

Do you want a top trainer wheel on? from Jack63 September 14, 2020 

It is compatible with the "Ant + FE-C" and "Bluetooth smart open" protocols. You can use all available Tacx software / apps and various third party software (Zwift, TrainerRoad, etc). It is compatible with Garmin devices equipped with the "Ant + Indoor Trainer" function. The Bushido is easy to calibrate. The trainer is very compact and does not require power. The pedaling is realistic enough for a whell on trainer.

Easy setup Accurate power Well-built Portable/storable

Good but a heavier flywheel would be appreciated from Andy September 12, 2020 

It's hard to judge this trainer fairly as I don't have anything to compare it to except the wahoo kickr snap. For the most part it does what it's supposed to do. Occasionally it takes a while for zwift to find it at the initial start up page (I use ANT). I've never had any problems with drop outs but there are some things that cold be better:

1) I had massive issues getting the amount of compression right on the wheel clamp. I had to get a 25c indoor wheel and even then I have to pump it to 130 psi and it still isn't able to reach the optium level of resistance when calibrating.

2) The tacx phone apps are rubbish. They sometimes work. They sometimes don't work.

3) it started out surprisingly quiet. It's now very noisy after 2 years use.

4) I'm not sure if the bushido even has a flywheel. If it does, you wouldn't know it. When using with zwift the most annoying thing about this trainer is that it simulates momentum very badly. On a lumpy road section, hitting a hill at the bottom of a fast decent, the bushido whacks the resistance right up regardless of how fast your wheel is spinning. Other trainers avoid this with a heavy flywheel.

Overall it's not a bad trainer. But you dont get much for the extra cost of this versus the flux. Naively, I was drawn in by the highest max watts and Max gradient simulation that the bushido can sustain. In reality these things are minor issues compared to the general feel of riding. Unless you can get a good deal on this trainer I'd say buy the flux insteae or save up for a wahoo.

Easy setup Portable/storable

Good “wheel on” option from Des September 9, 2020 

I've been using the Bushido for over a year on Zwift. Setup is easy once you have the wheelsize dialed. I sometimes use the Tacx turbo tyre, although apart from saving wear on my regular tyre, I have not noticed a difference in performance between the two. At sudden ramp ups in resistance there is a bit of wheel squeak.
The Bushido connects easily to the laptop via Bluetooth. Once or twice, when it didn't connect, a calibration on the Tacx app solved the problem.
I can't really think of anything else to add as it's so simple to use. Stick your bike on it, turn the pedals, let it connect and enjoy the ride!

Easy setup Accurate power Realistic inertiaWell-built Portable/storable Quiet

Older Tacx-model from LPrinter September 9, 2020 

Multiple issues with quality, i e bearings. Had to return it to the dealer twice, befor giving up.

Budget-friendly

Simple one and not expensive from Jumau September 9, 2020 
Easy setup Well-built Portable/storable Quiet Budget-friendly

Tacx Bushido from tomgakes September 9, 2020 

Power readings are about 25% off. Then wheel on setup makes a lot of noise.

Portable/storable Budget-friendly

Old but trustable from TriPi September 8, 2020 

I am now riding this wheel on tack for four years. Training for full Ironman and gran fondo’s . If you keep the tyre presure at 7 bar the resistance is good and power steady. Maybe not spot on but good for training in heart rate zones. Bad point is the noise, especially my kids hope I will one day have a silent one...

Easy setup Portable/storable Budget-friendly

Really Happy with It from TimD September 8, 2020 

This is my first smart trainer and I haven't tried any others, but it's kept me very happy. Quiet, plenty of resistance and works with wheel sizes from 26x2.0 to 700x38. Although I did go to the blue tire after frying a good road tire... didn't think I'd use it that much TBH but it's pretty addictive!
Coasting isn't that great, but that's not why I'm there anyway.

Easy setup Accurate power Well-built Portable/storable Quiet Budget-friendly

A good place to start from hotcamel September 5, 2020 

This was my first trainer. Easy to set up, and handy that is doesn’t require power. I paid about $700AUD for mine (new).

I notice compared to a tacx vortex smart that it seems a little louder.

I used to take it on trips as it was easy to fold away and stick in the back of the car.

Power was likely underestimated as when I bought some power meter pedals my FTP went up from 235 to 250.

I notice that compared to direct drive trainers, there is definitely a different “feel”. It doesn’t carry inertia well when changing between resistances, and on steep inclines there is virtually no inertia so each pedal stroke feels very weighty, and is now very smooth (I.e. going up the radio tower!)

I had mine for 4 years, and for the vast majority of users it will be more than adequate. A direct driver trainer “feels” better - but given that direct drive trainers are about $500+ more expensive - how much that “feel” is worth will be a decision you will have to make for yourself.

Easy setup Well-built Portable/storable Budget-friendly

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