Review: Favero Assioma Duo Power Meter Pedals

Review: Favero Assioma Duo Power Meter Pedals

I’ve been a fan of pedal-based power meters for several years ,because they can be easily swapped to another bike, and they’re measuring power right where it’s happening.

Garmin Vector 2 pedals were the first power meter I ever owned, and I used them for a few years, both indoors and out. And while they worked decently well, they were far from perfect – prone to accuracy problems if not properly torqued, chain clearance problems, and those annoying little plastic pods stick out weirdly and like to get bumped, which can affect accuracy as well.

So I went looking for a new set of power pedals in early 2020 – and the first place I looked was Favero. Their Assioma pedals seemed to have the best reputation of any in the Zwift Community, and they are also the most affordable. Here’s how the pricing shakes out for dual-sided power pedals currently on the market:

  • SRM Look Exakt: $1700 USD (included just for grins – who is paying $1700 for power pedals?)
  • Garmin Vector 3: $1000 USD
  • Powertap P2: $900 USD
  • Favero Assioma: $696

Like the Garmin and Powertap offerings, Assioma isn’t a first-generation product. Favero’s initial power pedals were called the bePRO. Assioma is the next-generation product, released in 2017. And it’s clear this isn’t Favero’s first power pedal rodeo.

After spending hundreds of hours riding the Assioma both indoors and out, I figured it was time to write up a review post. I hope you find it useful!

Favero Assioma Specs

  • Weight: 151.5 grams per pedal*
  • Q Factor: +54mm
  • Stack Height: 10.5mm
  • Accuracy: +-1%
  • Battery Life: ~500 recharge cycles at 50+ hours per charge

* At 303 grams per pair, the Assioma is the lightest power meter pedal on the market, beating out the Garmin Vector 3 (324 grams) and Powertap P2 (432 grams).

What’s In the Box?

Whether you buy the single or dual-sided version, the pedals ship with all you need:

  • The pedal(s) (of course)
  • A USB charging cord for each pedal – with a cool magnetic connection (more on that later)
  • A dual USB adapter to power the charger(s)
  • A pedal wrench
  • New cleats for your shoes: these are Xpedo-based cleats. Very similar to Look Keo cleats (which I already use) – but slightly different.
  • Pedal washers
  • Instruction booklets
  • Adapters for various world outlet types

Getting Set Up

Set up is easy, provided you have a smart phone and the tool needed to remove your current pedals.

First, activate the pedals via the Assioma app on iOS or Android. This is easily done – you click to search for the pedals (wiggle them a bit if they aren’t awake), then click to activate each pedal. (Your pedals won’t broadcast power until activated, which I assume is Favero’s way of tracking/enforcing warranty periods.)

Next it’s time to install the pedals. First remove your current pedals – depending on your current pedals you may need a pedal wrench for the job, or you can use the 8mm allen wrench included with the Assioma pedals.

I like to apply a bit of grease to my pedals whenever I install them, just to keep things smooth and happy. Then use any washers needed in order to offset the pedal body from your crank, and twist the pedals on using the included allen wrench. Easy peasy!

Once the pedals are installed you’ll want to do a zero offset in the app. Super easy – just connect to the pedals, then click “Settings” the arrow on “Zero offset”.

Unlike the Garmin Vector 2 pedals, Assiomas aren’t super picky about being torqued to a precise setting. So just snug them up like you would any other pedal, perform the zero offset, and ride.

Bedding In

With any power pedal, I recommend performing a zero offset before each ride, for the first several rides. Some riders will install the pedals and perform a few max effort sprints, then do the offset. Basically, what you’re wanting is to get the pedals “bedded in” – sometimes they move microscopically after being installed, and that affects the power readings. But typically after a few decent rides and hard sprints, pedals settle in and perform in a stable fashion moving forward.

Pairing in Zwift

Pairing in Zwift is super-simple as well. Just click “search” in the “Power Meter” box, and the Assioma will come up as an option. These pedals broadcast on both ANT+ and Bluetooth, so if your Zwift device supports both protocols, you’ll have the option of connecting via either method.

Many riders pair their power meter as the Power Source, and their smart trainer as “Controllable”. This is what I’ve done for years on Zwift, only recently switching to using my smart trainer’s power (more on that later). Riders do this for a few reasons:

  1. Because they use the same bike indoors and out, and want the same power meter used for all their efforts
  2. Because they trust the accuracy of their power meter over their smart trainer
  3. Because they want the extra watts of a pedal, crank, or spider-based power meter which reads wattage before drivetrain losses

Increasingly, though, we’re seeing racers dual-record their power, using their direct drive smart trainer as the power source in Zwift, and their power meter as the backup source, recorded on their bike computer. High-end Zwift Esports races now require that the direct-drive trainer as the primary power source, in fact, so we’ll probably see this practice continue to trickle down to the community racing level.

Charging

The pedals use a rechargeable built-in battery, unlike the Garmin and Powertap offerings which use replaceable batteries. Which is better? While there is something comfortable about the idea of being able to easily swap in fresh batteries, I lean toward built-in rechargeable batteries, for these reasons:

  • Since the manufacturer knows the characteristics of their batteries, they can provide accurate battery charging readouts
  • You don’t have to worry about “battery door” problems including water intrusion or oxidation which have plagued other pedal models
  • No need to buy batteries

A full charge cycle takes about 6 hours. Hooking the pedals up to charge has become one of my simple pleasures in life, thanks to Favero’s magnetic charger design. Check it out:

Battery Life

Favero says the batteries will last approximately 50 hours on a charge. I find it’s even more than that – closer to 60 hours.

One valid concern with a built-in battery is: what happens if it goes bad? The good news is, it’s a replaceable part – Favero can send you a new sensor unit. But you should never need it, because according to Favero the batteries are good for ~500 recharge cycles. And that’s 500 cycles at 50+ hours per charge, before it may decrease by up to 20% below that 50 hour mark!

If you do the math, 500 recharges at 50 hours per charge is 25000 hours of riding. If you ride 10 hours a week, that’s 25000/10/52=48 years of battery life.

User Experience

The pedals have performed flawlessly across hundreds of hours of Zwifting and outdoor riding.

I’ve used them mostly in conjunction with my Wahoo KICKR v4 (2018 model), then with my Wahoo KICKR v5 (2020 model). I also used them a bit on Monica’s OG Tacx NEO, as well as outdoor rides. Across all setups, they never failed to broadcast reliably and accurately.

Power Accuracy

Here are two sample rides that show the sort of data I’m typically seeing when riding with my KICKR 5 on Zwift while recording the Assioma data via my Wahoo ELEMNT bike computer:

I generally see the Assioma average power being 1.5-2.5% higher than the KICKR v5 power. Given the Assioma’s +-1% accuracy and the KICKR 5’s 1% accuracy, we’re well within spec given that drivetrain losses can easily amount to 2%.

One nice thing about the Assioma hardware is it uses Instantaneous Angular Velocity to computer power – which means they are accurate on oval chainrings. That’s something Garmin Vectors cannot do, although Powertap says their pedals are capable of it.

If you want to dig into power accuracy more you can always check out GPLama’s review or DC Rainmaker’s review.

Sticky Watts

One thing worth mentioning is Zwift’s sticky watts issue which affects anyone using an event-based power meter as their Zwift power source.

The summarize the issue: if you’re using an event-based power meter as your power source in Zwift (this would be any pedal, crank, or spider-based power meter) you’ll find your watts “stick” for 2-4 seconds when you suddenly stop pedaling. For the details on why this is and how it affects the Zwift experience, read Sticky Watts: Why They Exist, and How They Affect the Zwift Experience.

To be clear, this isn’t a weakness of the Assioma – but it is an issue Zwifters will encounter due to how Zwift works. For me, it’s annoying enough that I’ve moved to using my KICKR v5 as my main power source, with the Assioma as my backup source.

Cycling Dynamics

If you have certain Garmin head units (I don’t), the IAV Cycling Dynamics supported by the Assioma may interest you. Specifically, the Assioma detects and transmits two advanced metrics:

  • IAV Power Phase: detects where in your pedal stroke the power is being applied
  • IAV Rider Position: shows often often you are seated or standing

To the following Garmin head units: Edge 520 Plus, 530, 820, 830, 1030; Forerunner 935, 945; Fenix 5 Series, 5 Plus Series, MARQ Series.

These metrics are ANT+ only, and (as far as I know) only available on Garmin head units. It’s up to the creators of the head units to support these metrics. For more on this topic, here’s an in-depth post from DC Rainmaker.

More on the Assioma App

Favero’s iOS/Android app for the pedals works great, which is a welcome thing in a world where cycling apps are often sub-par (I’m looking at you, Tacx Utility!)

Along with allowing you to activate and zero offset your pedals, the app also lets you configure crank length and perform a static-weight calibration, which I tried just for the fun of it. This involves hanging a known weight from each pedal, which overrides the factory calibration.

Serviceability

Pedals, like other moving bike parts, can wear out. Favero has designed the Assioma so the pedal body is separate from the (much more expensive) electrical parts, so you can purchase an entire replacement pedal body (bearings, oil seal and closing parts) for €59.90.

You can also replace or lubricate the pedal bearings, just like other high-end pedals.

Two Negatives

There are just two negatives in my experience with the Assioma, and both feel a bit silly and minor. Still, here they are:

  • Xpedo? Really? Assioma uses the Xpedo cleat instead of Look, which is just different enough that you can feel a bit of tightness when riding the Xpedo cleat on Look pedals. This won’t matter at all for people with only one road bike. If you’re like me (with an indoor bike and outdoor bike), I’ve found that using the Xpedo cleats on my Look pedals just feels a bit tighter than I’m used to – but not a big enough deal for me to fuss about. Still, it would be nice if the pedals used a more common standard.
  • No Cycling Dynamics for Wahoo Head Units: this is a Wahoo problem and not a Favero one… but I’m still annoyed that I can’t get IAV Cycling Dynamics on my Wahoo ELEMNT head unit! If anyone knows a way for me to access the Assioma cycling dynamics via a PC, iOS app, or my ELEMNT, I’m all ears. Comment below!

Concluding Thoughts

With impressive accuracy and the best price of any pedal power meter on the market, it’s no surprise that Zwifters love the Assioma. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend them as my first choice for anyone looking for a pedal-based power meter.

Where to Buy

The Favero Assioma can be purchased direct from Favero (based in Italy) or at these Zwift Insider affiliate partners:

Questions or Comments?

Share below!

About The Author

Eric Schlange

Eric runs Zwift Insider in his spare time when he isn't on the bike or managing various business interests. He lives in Northern California with his beautiful wife, two kids and dog. Follow on Strava

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A zwifter
A zwifter
9 months ago

Unrelated but do you know what was included in the most recent update that just came out on PC/Mac? All I could find was Tour de Zwift sign up…

Spencer
Spencer (@jones-spence)
9 months ago

While the battery may be rated to 500 charge/discharge cycles, it is still going to be subject to the usual capacity erosion property of all lithium ion batteries. Over a few years, the battery capacity will noticeably drop even if you have only charged a handful of times.

Barkingmad
Barkingmad (@david)
9 months ago
Reply to  Spencer

Batteries due suffer reduced capacity due to age and charging cycles – but at up to 50 hours between charges most people are only going to be charging every 1-3 months – so just 4-12 charges a year. Plus the 500 charge cycles is usually to 75-80% of original capacity (not to complete failure).

Jackie Fraser
Jackie Fraser
4 months ago
Reply to  Spencer

I have had my Assioma pedals for just under 4 years now, ride about 12-60 hours a week, and have yet to see a decline.

Edu Harms
Edu Harms
9 months ago

Thanks For this review.
I am using my new assiomas with love, but you are saying that they should read higher power than the trainer..in my case (even after cleaning anf lupine the chain) its the oposite
https://www.zwiftpower.com/profile.php?z=885157&sid=e8927e4aec87f992172f5a642
9d08d5d

Barkingmad
Barkingmad (@david)
9 months ago
Reply to  Edu Harms

I’d recalibrate both (if your trainer supports it) and re-test. The Assiomas could be (more) right and it’s the trainer reading too high as typically pedal based power meters do read slightly higher as they are not seeing drivetrain losses.

Jozsi
Jozsi
9 months ago
Reply to  Edu Harms

You can validate your Assiomas with known weight as Eric did (just need at least 20kg for accurate results). So if it will be ok, then your Core is wrong. Btw my experience is lots of Cores are overmeasuring the power a bit (even after a good spin-down calibration…)

Jim Haysom
Jim Haysom (@haysom)
9 months ago

In the UK, you’ll find them at £629, down from £699 on Sigma Sports (highly respected retailer) for the Assioma Duo. That’s USD $854 with currency conversion. The US have got a bargain at those prices you mention in the post!!

Alex
Alex
9 months ago
Reply to  Jim Haysom

One relevant factor here is that they ship to the US without charging sales tax while customers in the EU/UK have VAT added. If you remove VAT, they are actually cheaper in the EU/UK than in the US.

D. Meadows
D. Meadows
5 months ago
Reply to  Alex

I just picked mine up for $673 USD directly from Assioma for the duo. Super happy with this price.

Jackie Fraser
Jackie Fraser
4 months ago
Reply to  Jim Haysom

I bought mine in the UK at just over £520 but 4 years ago, and have bought some for friends. I have noticed that if I had bought them in Italy, they would have been cheaper, bit there is no bike shops close to me in Aosta that stocks them 🙄

Duncan Putman
Duncan Putman
9 months ago

I’ve been using a pair of assioma duos for over 18months now although outdoors only. I think they are fabulous. They can be swapped between bikes in seconds if needed and are accurate in terms of data (in comparison to the readings I’ve had from my SRM and also my wahoo kickr). The app is great so you can easily check battery life and charge as needed. Battery life has been fine so far and I’ve not noticed any loss of life in the batteries. I use look cleats with all my shoes and they work fine. I don’t notice… Read more »

Simon Milbauer
Simon Milbauer
9 months ago

Been using assioma duo in my outdoor bike. Love them. Reliable, pairing with zero issues, long battery life. I think I’ll swap over for the winter training to my indoor set up…

ALAN HUMPHREYS
ALAN HUMPHREYS
9 months ago

Good review, thanks as I’ve just bought a pair. Any idea how to turn those leds off, I’m sure my wife will notice

MikeM
MikeM
9 months ago

Been using Assimoa Duos for a couple of years now on outdoor bikes. Think they are great, have had lots of wear in tough Scottish conditions. Sometimes use them on indoor bike too but only from time to time to check calibration against trainer. Easily swapped between bikes without the need for torque wrench or much fuss. If you have many bikes then not sure why you wouldn’t want a pair of these. If they offered a version for crank Bros cleats I’d buy a pair for my gravel bike too. Also useful to use them on rollers indoor with… Read more »

Simon Whitmore
Simon Whitmore
9 months ago

Another thing that’s quite cool but I hope you never need it is the remote service. Favero can look at your pedals data etc to check what’s wrong with them when you connect to the Assioma App.

Daniel Hauser
Daniel Hauser
9 months ago

I love my Assioma pedals. As for cleats, the cleats are known to be tight. It was recommended to use the Look Keo Gray cleats. I have been doing this for 2.5 years now (10,000) miles with no problems. They aren’t quite as tight and would work with your pedals on your other bike.

Jerry Sobel
Jerry Sobel
9 months ago
Reply to  Daniel Hauser

I ride Look Gray cleats but I have been reluctant to get the Assioma pedals because Look cleats are not recommended. You have been good with them? Do they float more than on Look pedals?

Nigel Tufnel
Nigel Tufnel
8 months ago
Reply to  Jerry Sobel

I rode mine with the grey Keo cleats. Never any issues and, to me, they feel just like the Looks.

Ron Chatfield
Ron Chatfield (@rchatfield)
9 months ago

I wish that the cleat system was interchangeable, I love my Speedplay pedals and have them on all my bikes so I don’t’ have to switch the pedals between them. My opinion is that the first true power pedals to allow cleats of the riders choosing will put the rest to bed.

Barkingmad
Barkingmad (@david)
9 months ago
Reply to  Ron Chatfield
PBJ
PBJ
9 months ago

Right now, I just have the UNO but I notice whenever I sit up in the saddle or back down to the bars my power dips by about 15-20% each time for about 5 seconds. It’s really strange and it caused me to be dropped in my first Zwift race when I sat up to grab some water off a nearby table. Maybe it’s an UNO problem or maybe I’m missing something.

Benjamin
Benjamin (@benjamin_pitt)
9 months ago

Quote – “I generally see the Assioma average power being 1.5-2.5% higher than the KICKR v5 power. Given the Assioma’s +-1% accuracy and the KICKR 5’s 1% accuracy, we’re well within spec given that drivetrain losses can easily amount to 2%.” that’s not what the +- accuracy means. The +- accuracy is the variable difference in accuracy from one pedal stroke reading to the next on the SAME power meter. Not the +- accuracy to an industry standard. Even if two different power meters where rated at +-0% – you could get a difference of 3% between them and they’d… Read more »

Dan Connelly
Dan Connelly
9 months ago
Reply to  Benjamin

They’re also measuring power at different points. It would be like measuring electrical power at the generator versus at the house — some is lost in the wires. In the case of a bike, some is lost in the drivetrain.

Greg Nichols
Greg Nichols
9 months ago

After 8 months of use my inner bearings went out and were toast. I tried to get the company to warranty them, but they were too slow. I figured out the bearing size and bought some at the local Remote control store, they use the same size in RC cars. The inner are 10x15x4 you will need two per pedal and the single outter is 6x13x5. I got good sealed ones and then packed them with good grease. This process makes them so much easier to get into the pedals as they don’t spin 500rpms if you miss. Replacing the… Read more »

Erich
Erich
9 months ago

I love my pedals too but find that when they connect to zwift it resets the crankarm length in the app to the default 172.5. Anyone else have this happen consistently?

David Kelly
David Kelly
9 months ago
Reply to  Erich

Yes, although the recent app update seems to have ended this.

David Shinn
David Shinn
8 months ago
Reply to  David Kelly

How long has this bug been going on?

Paul Whitaker
9 months ago

Great review, as always, Eric. I’ve owned my Duos for 2.5 years now and they’ve been great. I had a problem with one of the batteries losing charge. Favero tech support was first rate. They gave me diagnostic checks to run and pulled diagnostic data from the app., they then sent me a new firmware to try with revised battery management and when that didn’t work they sent me a new sensor unit. No problems with the pedals since. I’ve used them on the trainer to verify trainer power measurements a couple of times, but I’d be reluctant to use… Read more »

Marco
Marco
9 months ago

The difference between Assioma and Kickr Watts is due to the chain/system friction.
It is more or less 8-10Watts. It can’t be equal!
That is why the Pro’s has to use the Kickr/Flux power source at first place to become equal and use the crank/pedal system as 2nd source to a Wahoo/Garmin Unit

Peter
Peter
9 months ago

I had the original bePros, and while I really liked them to begin with, but I had two substantial issues. First, I went to plug the charger into one pedal and something happened that melted the pins inside the pedal and caused the pod to swell. I didn’t do anything different than I would plugging in a cell phone. After several back and forths with Favero including shipping the pedal back at my expense, they said I must have done something to it and wouldn’t honor the warranty. I bit the bullet and bought a replacement pod. Second was a… Read more »

Shirley Mitrou
Shirley Mitrou
9 months ago

So how easy is it to unclip from these in real life riding? I broke my arm a couple months ago when I couldn’t unclip so having pedals where I can adjust the ease of unclipping is important to me. Is there an adjustment on them to make it easier to unclip? (Thx for the review – so appreciated)

C.L.F.
C.L.F.
9 months ago

Another interesting article! I would like some power pedals, too, to take measurements outside. But I just like the Speedplay pedals so much that I would not want to switch back to Look. Haven’t found any Speedplay power pedals so far, though…

David Kelly
David Kelly
9 months ago

What pedals do the FA cleats work with? I would like to have a spare pair of pedals around in case my FAs need maintenance.

Matt Edler
Matt Edler
8 months ago

Great review, and thanks for bringing up the sticky watts issue again, would like to see more transparency about this moving forward, racing off pedals with as much as a 10% error and not switching to to a smart trainer can spoil the experience for those who do.

Christian Schwartz
Christian Schwartz
8 months ago

thanks for the review. I have Assioma‘s Duo and Garmin‘s Vector 3. Both appear to have quite some lag betreten left and Right. The right Pedal collects the Data From the left which sends it to the Head Unit. For both I observiert a permanent lag of some 3-5 Percent Points.
This May be related to My pedalling physics. However, I have also a crank based Meter and the Neo2T Feature. Both of the latter suggest constant 50/50 percent balance.
Any Comments, please?

Christian Schwartz
Christian Schwartz
8 months ago

Sorry, left Pedal collects from Right. Right always is behind for Assioma and Vector.

Nigel Tufnel
Nigel Tufnel
8 months ago

My guess is that they use the Xpedo to save a few $$ over licensing of the Look standard.

Frank
Frank
8 months ago

Hi Eric,

thanks for your review.
I am a owner of UNO and thinking about updating to DUO. (main Focus Spin Bike, Zwift via Apple TV and Bluetooth) I just read that Data is transmitted in one channel / dataset to Zwift. I am asking myself if updating makes sense? (Accuracy) What is your opinion?

Jean F. Peeters
Jean F. Peeters
6 months ago

I fully agree with your review, dear Eric, except on one point: the link with my Wahoo Elemnt Roam. I have them now for a little more than a year and I use the duos to limit losing power of my left leg due to a Parkinson disease (I’m 56). I could easily link both pedals to my Wahoo Elemnt Roam. I bought this Wahoo especially because it can show the division of power between both legs. Which allows me to focus on my left leg and keep it running. The division (35/65%) has remained the same since. No further… Read more »

Fuad
Fuad
6 months ago

Excellent review Eric!!

A quick question, do you have any news about the IAV Cycling Dynamics in Wahoo?
I’m thinking about changing my Assioma UNO to DUOs, but since I use a Wahoo Bolt I’m not sure if I’m going to be able to squeeze the full potential of these DUO pedals.
What are your thoughts in the case Wahoo has not given an answer to this? Would you recommend me on migrating to another cycling head unit? Which one would you recommend overall best cost/benefit?

Thank you in advance.

Andrei
Andrei (@aistratov)
4 months ago
Reply to  Fuad

I have some experience with this. I use WKO5 program which downloads data from Training Peaks. A free account on Training Peaks is all that one needs to use it as a storage depository similar to free version of Strava. WKO5 requires a one-time payment for the software license (about $70 or so, no subscription, license is perpetual). I really like this program and believe it is the best tool for analysis of cycling data available on the market. There is tons of analytics in it, much more than in subscription version of the Training Peaks (and you can analyze… Read more »

Des Duffy
Des Duffy
1 month ago

Hi,
I’m looking from assistance please. I have a pair of assioma duo which I currently use on a spin bike until I get home in December. I am working abroad at the minute. I connected the pedals to zwift and head off for a cycle but my power numbers struggled to get over 100watts but when I connected the pedals to my garmin watch it was showing between 180 and 200 Watts OK. Any suggestions on what I may have done wrong?
Thanks in advance.

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